A Waking Joy

Is it because it is not thou I see,

But only my poor, blotted fancy of thee?

Oh! never till thyself reveal thy face,

Shall I be flooded with life’s vital grace.

Oh make my mirror-heart thy shining-place,

And then my soul, awaking with the morn,

Shall be a waking joy, eternally new-born.

— George MacDonald

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A New Gift of Life

If every sunlit, sail crowded sea under blue heaven, flecked with wind chased white filled your soul, as with a new gift of life – think what sense of existence must be yours if He, whose thought has but fringed His garment with the gladness of such a show, were to make his home with you – and while thinking of the gladness of God inside your being, let you know and feel that He is carrying you as a Father in his bosom!

Unspoken sermons, “Life” by George MacDonald

Creeping Christians

We are and remain such creeping Christians, because we look at ourselves and not at Christ, because we gaze at the marks of our own soiled feet, and the trail of our own defiled garments… Each, putting his foot in the footprint of the Master, and so defacing it, turns to examine how far his neighbors footprint corresponds with that which he still calls the Master’s, although it is but his own.

— George Macdonald

The Spirit Strives With Our Spirit

A man will please God better by believing some things that are not told him, than by confining his faith to those things that are expressly said-said to arouse in us the truth-seeing faculty, the spiritual desire, the prayer for the good things which God will give to them who ask him.

"But is this not dangerous doctrine? Will not a man be taught thus to believe the things he likes best, even to pray for that which he likes best? And will he not grow arrogant in his confidence?"

If it be true that the Spirit strives with our spirit, if it be true that God teaches men, we may safely leave those dreaded results to him. If the man is of the Lord's company, he is safer with him than with those who would secure their safety by hanging on the outskirts and daring nothing. if he is not taught of God in that which he hopes for, God will let him know it. He will receive something else than he prays for. If he can pray to God for anything not good, the answer will come in the flames of that consuming fire. These will soon bring him to some of his spiritual sense. But it will be far better for him to be thus sharply tutored, than to go on a snail's pace in the journey of the spiritual life. And for arrogance, I have seen nothing breed it faster or in more offensive forms than the worship of the letter.

—George MacDonald, Unspoken Sermons

Thou Art my Home

"That man is perfect in faith who can come to God in the utter dearth of his feelings and his desires, without a glow or an aspiration, with the weight of low thoughts, failures, neglects, and wandering forgetfulness, and say to him, 'Thou art my refuge, because thou art my home.'"

-George MacDonald