The Giver

Creation seems to be delegation through and through. He will do nothing simply by Himself which can be done by creatures. I suppose this is because He is a giver. And He has nothing to give but Himself. And to give Himself is to do His deeds – in a sense, and on varying levels to be Himself- through the things He has made.

–CS Lewis, Letters To Malcolm; chapter 13

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Departures are all Alike

I shouldn’t be at all disturbed if it could be shown that a diabolical mysticism, or drugs, produced experiences indistinguishable (by introspection) from those of the great christian mystics. Departures are all alike, it is the landfall that crowns a voyage. The saint, by being a saint, proves that his mysticism led him aright; the fact that he has practiced mysticism could never prove his sanctity.

– CS Lewis, Letters to Malcolm

How the Great Wind Came to Beacon House

How the Great Wind Came to Beacon House

A wind sprang high in the west, like a wave of unreasonable happiness, and tore eastward across England, trailing with it the frosty scent of forests and the cold intoxication of the sea. In a million holes and corners it refreshed a man like a flagon, and astonished him like a blow. In the inmost chambers of intricate and embowered houses it woke like a domestic explosion, littering the floor with some professor’s papers till they seemed as precious as fugitive, or blowing out the candle by which a boy read “Treasure Island” and wrapping him in roaring dark. But everywhere it bore drama into undramatic lives, and carried the trump of crisis across the world. Many a harassed mother in a mean backyard had looked at five dwarfish shirts on the clothes-line as at some small, sick tragedy; it was as if she had hanged her five children. The wind came, and they were full and kicking as if five fat imps had sprung into them; and far down in her oppressed subconscious she half-remembered those coarse comedies of her fathers when the elves still dwelt in the homes of men. Many an unnoticed girl in a dank walled garden had tossed herself into the hammock with the same intolerant gesture with which she might have tossed herself into the Thames; and that wind rent the waving wall of woods and lifted the hammock like a balloon, and showed her shapes of quaint clouds far beyond, and pictures of bright villages far below, as if she rode heaven in a fairy boat. Many a dusty clerk or cleric, plodding a telescopic road of poplars, thought for the hundredth time that they were like the plumes of a hearse; when this invisible energy caught and swung and clashed them round his head like a wreath or salutation of seraphic wings. There was in it something more inspired and authoritative even than the old wind of the proverb; for this was the good wind that blows nobody harm.

Excerpt From

Manalive

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

https://books.apple.com/us/book/manalive/id498683671

On a lovely windy afternoon on a lake in Texas, this intro couldn’t have come at a more perfect time. With it came strains of George’s At the Back of the North Wind, and Lewis’s bit on the wind that blew through St. Anne’s in That Hideous Strength, and of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Eve. It even brought to mind the aria that soared among the captives in Shaw Shank Redemption. Most certainly these are winds that blow nobody wrong, and more. They are winds that lift men up out of our mundane and troubled little world, up and into a larger space. A space where men are free in heart and mind, even though we may be as the Apostle said, troubled on every side. Yet we are not in despair, for the star of hope shines bright, and it’s song has got into our hearts. And so long as there is hope and a song in his heart, no man can ever be a slave. 🌟💛🌟

Preparation for the Gospel

“For my part, I believe we ought to work not only at spreading the gospel (that certainly) but also at a certain preparation for the gospel. It is necessary to recall many to the Law of Nature before we talk about God. For Christ promises forgiveness of sins: But what is that to those who since they do not know the Law of Nature, do not know that they have sinned? Who will take the medicine unless he knows he is in the grip of disease? Moral relativity is the enemy we have to overcome before we tackle atheism.”

C.S. Lewis, Letters to Calabria

Read it Conscientiously

… A difficult work to judge. Read it conscientiously from cover to cover, and you will conclude that it is the heaviest of tasks; but then from such a reading something will cling to your memory – odd lines, odd scenes, a peculiar flavour – till you are driven back to it, to find that its faults are just as grievous as you first supposed but that its merits are greater.

 –– C. S. Lewis on Stephen Hawes, Pastime of Pleasure

The Great Race

No amount of falls will really undo us if we keep picking ourselves up each time. We shall of course be very muddy and tattered children by the time we reach home. But the bathrooms are all ready, the towels put out, & the clean clothes are in the airing cupboard. The only fatal thing is to lose one’s temper and give it up. It is when we notice the dirt that God is most present in us; it is the very sign of His presence.

C.S. Lewis, The Collected Letters, Volume II