A New Gift of Life

If every sunlit, sail crowded sea under blue heaven, flecked with wind chased white filled your soul, as with a new gift of life – think what sense of existence must be yours if He, whose thought has but fringed His garment with the gladness of such a show, were to make his home with you – and while thinking of the gladness of God inside your being, let you know and feel that He is carrying you as a Father in his bosom!

Unspoken sermons, “Life” by George MacDonald

Advertisements

The Spirit Strives With Our Spirit

A man will please God better by believing some things that are not told him, than by confining his faith to those things that are expressly said-said to arouse in us the truth-seeing faculty, the spiritual desire, the prayer for the good things which God will give to them who ask him.

"But is this not dangerous doctrine? Will not a man be taught thus to believe the things he likes best, even to pray for that which he likes best? And will he not grow arrogant in his confidence?"

If it be true that the Spirit strives with our spirit, if it be true that God teaches men, we may safely leave those dreaded results to him. If the man is of the Lord's company, he is safer with him than with those who would secure their safety by hanging on the outskirts and daring nothing. if he is not taught of God in that which he hopes for, God will let him know it. He will receive something else than he prays for. If he can pray to God for anything not good, the answer will come in the flames of that consuming fire. These will soon bring him to some of his spiritual sense. But it will be far better for him to be thus sharply tutored, than to go on a snail's pace in the journey of the spiritual life. And for arrogance, I have seen nothing breed it faster or in more offensive forms than the worship of the letter.

—George MacDonald, Unspoken Sermons

My Saviour

I believe that He is my Saviour from myself, and all that has come of loving myself, from all that God does not love, and would not have me love-all that is not worth loving; that He died that the justice, the mercy of God, might have its way with me, making me just as God is just, merciful as He is merciful, perfect as my Father in heaven is perfect.

—George MacDonald, Unspoken Sermons (Series Three)

From Doubts to Assurance

Doubt must precede every deeper assurance; for uncertainties are what we first see when we look into a region hitherto unknown, unexplored, unannexed. In all Job’s begging and longing to see God, then, may well be supposed to mingle the mighty desire to be assured of God’s being. To acknowledge is not to be sure of God. One great point in the poem is–that when Job hears the voice of God, though it utters no word of explanation, it is enough to him to hear it: he knows that God is, and that he hears the cry of his creature. That he is there, knowing all about him, and what had befallen him, is enough; he needs no more to reconcile seeming contradictions, and the worst ills of outer life become endurable. Even if Job could not at first follow his argument of divine probability, God settled everything for him when, by answering him out of the whirlwind, he showed him that he had not forsaken him.

— George MacDonald, Unspoken Sermons; the father of Till we have Faces and GK Chesterton’s The Man Who Was Thursday?