Roads Go Ever On

Roads go ever ever on,
Over rock and under tree,
By caves where never sun has shone,
By streams that never find the sea;
Over snow by winter sown,
And through the merry flowers of June,
Over grass and over stone,
And under mountains in the moon.

Roads go ever ever on,
Under cloud and under star.
Yet feet that wandering have gone
Turn at last to home afar.
Eyes that fire and sword have seen,
And horror in the halls of stone
Look at last on meadows green,
And trees and hills they long have known.

The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way,
Where many paths and errands meet.

The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with weary feet,
Until it joins some larger way,
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say.

The Road goes ever on and on
Out from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone.
Let others follow, if they can!
Let them a journety new begin.
But I at last with weary feet
Will turn towards the lighted inn,
My evening-rest and sleep to meet.

Still ’round the corner there may wait
A new road or secret gate;
And though I oft have passed them by,
A day will come at last when I
Shall take the hidden paths that run
West of the Moon, East of the Sun.

– J. R. R. Tolkien
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Shall We Bemoan Any Darkness?

One of the main points of The Man Who Was Thursday…

“Shall we then bemoan any darkness? Shall we not rather gird up our strength to encounter it, that we too from our side may break the passage for the light beyond it? He who fights with the dark shall know the gentleness that makes man great – the dawning countenance of the God of hope. But that was not for Cosmo just yet. The night must fulfill it’s hours. Men are meant and sent to be troubled — that they may rise above the whole region of storm, above all possibility of being troubled.”

George MacDonald, Castle Warlock

Poor and Miserable Beasts

We are such poor and miserable beasts – rooting and clawing for satisfaction and cessation of the raging emptiness and hunger in our souls. And yet we cannot have at first, the very things our souls are dying for – cessation of strife, satisfaction of desire, and joy. We must first learn discipline and be brought to good health. The first thing is to clean the mangy beast, to heal the diseases, to wash the hair and skin, and to make the little beast less “beastly,” and more fit for living among other real human beings… So that at long last, we may be capable of humanity, of strength, of knowledge, of beauty, and of ultimate peace and joy. But the road is hard, and the wait is long. God grant us the patience to persevere, and to not give up before the bell is rung.

“We are to be re-made. All the rabbit in us is to disappear—the worried, conscientious, ethical rabbit as well as the cowardly and sensual rabbit. We shall bleed and squeal as the handfuls of fur come out; and then, surprisingly, we shall find underneath it all a thing we have never yet imagined: a real Man, an ageless god, a son of God, strong, radiant, wise, beautiful, and drenched in joy.”
~ C.S. Lewis, Man or Rabbit