Never Such a Fair Man on Their Side

“There was no man like Shakespeare for drawing pictures of good women. Women had never such a fair man on their side as Shakespeare. Even those that he did not approve of, he was never cruel or contemptuous to. He had a tender heart for all humanity, and while he drew the most lovely women, he was forbearing and gentle towards those whom he did not approve of.”

– George MacDonald, lecture on ‘The Merchant of Venice.’

Advertisements

Not With the Eyes

“So I, admiring of his qualities.

Things base and vile, holding no quantity,

Love can transpose to form and dignity.

Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind;

And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind.

Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgment taste;

Wings, and no eyes, figure unheedy haste;

And therefore is Love said to be a child,

Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.

As waggish boys in game themselves forswear,

So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;”
Excerpt From: Shakespeare, William. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” PlayShakespeare.com. iBooks. 

This material may be protected by copyright.
Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itun.es/us/lyPN2.l

The Course of True Love

 

Ay me! For aught that I could ever read,

Could ever hear by tale or history,

The course of true love never did run smooth:

O cross! too high to be enthrall’d to low!

Or else misgraffed in respect of years; —

O spite! Too old to be engag’d to young!

Or else it stood upon the choice of friends:

O hell! to chose by love another’s eye!

Or, if there were a sympathy in choice,

War, death, or sickness, did lay siege to it,

Making it momentary as a sound,

Swift as a shadow, short as any dream;

Brief as the lightning in the collied night

That in a spleen, unfolds both heaven and earth,

And ere a man hath power to say, Behold!

The jaws of darkness do devour it up:

So quick bright things come to confusion.

If then true lovers have been ever cross’d,

It stands as an edict in destiny:

Then let us teach our trial patience,

Because it is a customary cross; (sighs)

As due to love as thoughts, and dreams, and

Wishes, and tears, poor fancy’s followers.

 

— Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream