On Spiritual Nature

A man’s reaction to Monarchy is a kind of test. Monarchy can easily be “debunked;” but watch the faces, mark the accents of the debunkers. These are the men whose tap-root in Eden has been cut: whom no rumor of the polyphony, the dance, can reach – men to whom pebbles laid in a row are more beautiful than an arch. Yet even if they desire equality, they cannot reach it. Where men are forbidden to honor a king they honor millionaires, athletes or film-stars instead: even famous prostitutes or gangsters. For spiritual nature, like bodily nature, will be served; deny it food and it will gobble poison.

CS Lewis: “Equality” in Present Concerns

So beautifully stated – this idea has been on my mind recently, for I think it ties in to the idea of honoring parents. I think the instances of Kings being “divinely appointed,” or the divine right of kings has been very few and far between. It has happened, but it is a far step (not to say a very chasm) from there and the fallacy that insists that every ruler was appointed by God. This (latter) belief is sometimes accepted by good men, but who have been amused and are literally also away from thinking, whose manhood and ability to think and reason has been stolen from them, not taught them, but abolished. And this fallacy is generally perpetuated by the power seekers themselves, for it is in their favor to be so thought of. But to feel that idea (of the beauty of monarchy) to be romantic is a good and natural thing, and to not understand it at all is to have lost our humanity, and our sense for the good, the true and the beautiful, and our appreciation of archetypes. The one place I believe this idea is always true, is with parents. Every one of our parents was given to us by God. And whether good or bad, these are the people- like the family Chesterton speaks of (people we are put into families with, and told to get along). These are the people we must learn to love, honor and obey. And I believe that the words of Lewis ring monumentally true at home and hearth as well – where men are forbidden to honor parents, they will honor millionaires, athletes and film stars. I wonder if the idea of monarchy is not merely a child idea who has lost his own love for parents, and has wandered away in the dark, and given his love to newly found replacements, and false images.

(I should add that I believe the archetype is possibly a true one – our rulers were possibly intended to be appointed by God. But in a world like today’s, God is dead, and so also is his rule. But it is still a question mark- why did God, with the children of Israel seem to prefer sending prophets than appointing Kings?)

~ Watergirl 🌸

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Splendid and Strange

“That is what makes life at once so splendid and so strange. We are in the wrong world. When I thought that was the right town, it bored me; when I knew it was wrong, I was happy. So the false optimism, the modern happiness, tires us because it tells us we fit into this world. The true happiness is that we don’t fit. We come from somewhere else. We have lost our way.”

― G.K. Chesterton, Tremendous Trifles,

Love is Holy

From George MacDonald’s lecture on ‘King Lear,’ regarding Cordelia’s response when asked to declare her love for her father in

order to inherit a portion of his kingdom:

“She loved her father far too much to be able to tell it out in that fashion. Even the best things she could say would have been as nothing compared with their eager protestations. Love is not to be measured by a dictionary. Love is holy, and loving hearts cannot lay themselves out for the asking. We don’t want to hear our children speak of their love; the look, the manner, the action–these are the language of the heart.”

– George MacDonald

The Giver

Creation seems to be delegation through and through. He will do nothing simply by Himself which can be done by creatures. I suppose this is because He is a giver. And He has nothing to give but Himself. And to give Himself is to do His deeds – in a sense, and on varying levels to be Himself- through the things He has made.

–CS Lewis, Letters To Malcolm; chapter 13

True Education is Truest Kindness

“Those who love certain animals selfishly, pampering them, as so many mothers do their children with worse results, that they may be loved of them in return, betray them to their enemies. They are not lovers of animals, but only of favourites, and do their part to make the rest of the world dislike animals. Theirs are the dogs that inhospitably growl and bark and snap, moving the indifferent to dislike, and confirming the unfriendly in their antagonism. Any dog-parliament, met in the interests of their kind, would condemn such dogs to be discreetly bitten, and their mistresses to be avoided.

And certainly, if animals are intended to live and grow, she is the enemy of any individual animal, who stunts his moral and intellectual development by unwise indulgence.

Of whatever nature be the heaven of the animals, that animal is not in the fair way to enter it. The education of the lower lies at the door of the higher, and in true education is truest kindness.”

– George MacDonald, Hope of the Gospel

ADVENIAT REGNUM TUUM

Not that the widespread wings of wrong brood o’er a moaning earth,

Not from the clinging curse of gold, the random lot of birth;

Not from the misery of the weak, the madness of the strong,

Goes upward from our lips the cry, “How long, oh Lord, how long?”

Not only from the huts of toil, the dens of sin and shame,

From lordly halls and peaceful homes the cry goes up the same;

Deep in the heart of every man, where’er his life be spent,

There is a noble weariness, a holy discontent.

Where’er to mortal eyes has come, in silence dark and lone,

Some glimmer of the far-off light the world has never known,

Some ghostly echoes from a dream of earth’s triumphal song,

Then as the vision fades we cry, “How long, oh Lord, how long?”

Long ages, from the dawn of time, men’s toiling march has wound

Towards the world they ever sought, the world they never found;

Still far before their toiling path the glimmering promise lay,

Still hovered round the struggling race, a dream by night and day.

Mid darkening care and clinging sin they sought their unknown home,

Yet ne’er the perfect glory came—Lord, will it ever come?

The weeding of earth’s garden broad from all its growths of wrong,

When all man’s soul shall be a prayer, and all his life a song.

Aye, though through many a starless night we guard the flaming oil,

Though we have watched a weary watch, and toiled a weary toil,

Though in the midnight wilderness, we wander still forlorn,

Yet bear we in our hearts the proof that God shall send the dawn.

Deep in the tablets of our hearts he writes that yearning still,

The longing that His hand hath wrought shall not his hand fulfil?

Though death shall close upon us all before that hour we see,

The goal of ages yet is there—the good time yet to be:

Therefore, tonight, from varied lips, in every house and home,

Goes up to God the common prayer, “Father, Thy Kingdom come.”

G.K. Chesterton – 17 years old